Medicare Advantage

Get A Free Quote Today!

An Introduction to the Medicare Advantage Program for Seniors Turning 65

If you are a senior citizen, turning 65 is an important milestone. It’s also a time when there can be a lot of confusion about health insurance. One of the options available to seniors over 65 is the Medicare Advantage program. Let’s take a look at what this program has to offer and how you can benefit from it.

What Is Medicare Advantage?


Medicare Advantage plans are offered by private companies that contract with the government to provide coverage for those enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B). These plans are sometimes called “Part C” or “MA Plans” and they typically include additional benefits such as prescription drug coverage, vision, hearing, and dental coverage, as well as other services not covered by Original Medicare.

What Are the Benefits of Medicare Advantage?


One of the primary benefits of enrolling in a MA Plan is that you will usually have lower out-of-pocket costs than with Original Medicare alone. This is because most MA Plans come with no (or low) deductibles and often include extra benefits such as vision and dental coverage that may not be included in Original Medicare. Additionally, many MA Plans include built-in prescription drug coverage, so if you need medication for an existing condition or chronic illness, you won’t have to worry about buying any additional plans or figuring out which drugs are covered.

Another benefit is that MA Plans often provide more comprehensive coverage than Original Medicare does; some plans even cover medical services that aren’t typically covered by Part A or Part B, such as acupuncture or chiropractic visits. Last but not least, some MA Plans also offer discounts on other services like gym memberships and meals delivery programs.

When it comes to making decisions about your healthcare needs, there’s no one-size-fits-all solution. But if you’re turning 65 soon and looking for an affordable way to get the most out of your healthcare plan while taking advantage of some added perks, then considering enrolling in a Medicare Advantage plan could be an excellent choice for you! With its lower costs and extensive coverage options, it’s definitely worth exploring further if you’re looking for ways to save money on healthcare without compromising on quality care.

Common Questions about Medicare Advantage

  • Medicare Advantage (MA) is a type of health insurance that provides benefits to seniors and people with disabilities. It’s also known as “private Medicare,” because it’s offered by private companies instead of the federal government.

    There are four main types of MA plans:

    Traditional Medicare Advantage Plans – These plans offer many of the same benefits as traditional Medicare, but they can be customized for your needs. They may include more or fewer services than traditional Medicare offers, such as vision care, dental coverage, hearing aids, long-term care, home health care, hospice care, prescription drugs, and other benefits. You may have to pay an extra monthly premium if you choose this plan.

  •  

    Special Needs Plan – This plan covers some additional medical conditions, like diabetes, cancer, heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injury, and others. The plan pays for doctor visits, hospital stays, lab tests, medications, equipment, and other treatments related to these conditions. There is no deductible or co-pay required.

  •  

    Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) - An HMO is a managed care organization that contracts with Medicare to provide certain covered services at a lower cost than traditional Medicare would cover. For example, an HMO might charge less for office visits, diagnostic testing, and prescriptions. However, there will likely be higher out-of-pocket costs for things like emergency room visits, hospital stays, and surgeries. Some plans require you to use a primary care physician who works for the HMO. Others allow you to see any provider in your area.

  • Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) - A PPO is another type of managed care organization that contracts directly with Medicare. Like an HMO, a PPO usually has negotiated rates with doctors and hospitals. But unlike an HMO, a typical PPO doesn't control which providers you can visit. Instead, it gives members the option of seeing doctors and/or hospitals that work with them. Members must select their own primary care physicians from among those participating in the program.
  • Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) - In a fee-for-service plan, you generally pay all charges up front. Your insurer then reimburses you based on what you actually spend. If you don't need all the services provided under the plan, you won't get paid for them. Private Fee-for-Service plans typically do not include deductibles or copays.

  • Medicare Advantage plans offer more benefits than traditional Medicare, but they come at a cost. The most common costs include higher premiums, deductibles, co-pays, and out-of-pocket expenses.

    The other downside to these plans is that they require members to use an HMO (health maintenance organization) doctor instead of their regular primary care physician

  • Medicare Advantage plans offer more benefits than traditional Medicare coverage. These include prescription drug coverage, vision care, dental care, hearing aids, long-term care insurance, and other health benefits.

    In addition, these plans often provide additional benefits such as wellness programs, transportation assistance, and access to doctors and hospitals.

Medicare Advantage plans are not the same as traditional Medicare. They offer additional benefits, such as vision and dental coverage, prescription drug coverage, and more